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20121129
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the taxes scheduled to go up if we go over the fiscal cliff will hit investors. we ask the c.e.o. of utility next era energy lew hay about higher taxes on dividends and stock gains. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! black friday comes early this year. all across the country americans are already lining up outside stores, camping out for the earlier-than-ever start to the holiday shopping season. scenes like this are popping up in shopping mall parking lots. these tents are pitched outside a best buy in tampa, florida, where shoppers are hoping to get the early-bird holiday specials. with big retail chains opening their doors for black friday, on thursday night, there are complaints about companies putting commerce ahead of family time. walmart has been threatened with protests by its employees. the company filed a complaint with the national labor relations board hoping to stop the demonstrations, but the board won't rule on it before tomorrow. diane eastabrook looks at the personal price of thanksgiving day store hours. >> reporter: this is the calm before the storm at a chicago
to vote for higher taxes. find out what grover norquist thinks will happen with the fiscal cliff. >> susie: and hewlett packard stuns investors with news of an $9 billion mistake. >> tom: that and more tonight on nbr! >> susie: federal reserve chairman ben bernanke came to new york city today to send a tough message back to washington-- get your act together. he urged lawmakers and the white house to reach a quick deal to avoid the fiscal cliff, saying it might mean next year could be "a very good one for the economy." ben bernanke didn't endorse any specific tax or spending policies to solve the fiscal cliff, but he urged lawmakers to think creatively. he said an agreement on ways to reduce long-term federal budget deficits could remove road blocks to growth. on the other hand, going over the cliff might mean a recession. on top of that, worries about a deal were already causing trouble. >> uncertainty about how the fiscal cliff, the raising of the debt limit, and the longer-term budget situation will be addressed appears already to be affecting private spending and investment decisions,
and tax increases at the start of 2013. from the white house came word that president obama will try to build public pressure on congress to raise taxes on the wealthy and prevent tax hikes for everyone else. white house spokesman jay carney. >> well, the president believes very strongly that the american people matter in this debate. because this debate is about them. the question of whether or not taxes go up on 98% of american tax payers is a very important to ordinary americans. it is not just a matter for discussion between the president and the senate minority leader. or other congressional leaders. >> brown: to that end the president met privately today with small business owners. on friday he'll travel to the philadelphia area to speak further on the issue. not to be outdone, house republicans said they'll meet with small business owners and workers in their districts arguing against the president's plan. in the senate republican my ontario leader mitch mcconnell dismissed the president's new tactics. >> as we head into the fiscal cliff negotiations, my advice to the presiden
called "a minimum tax for the wealthy." and you start off bying a most investors you know, if it's a good deal they're not going to be upset about the fact that they're going to have to pay some tax. >> every investor i know. i've never -- i'm 82 years old and i'm looking like diogenes at that investor who says "i think i'll look at this chance to pass on this money." >> rose: even if it's a certain deal -- >> i'm going to call you tonight at midnight and say "this is the best idea i've ever had." and will you say "how much is the tax i have to pay?" >> rose: i don't think so. you say "in the meantime maybe we'll run into someone with a terrific investment idea who won't go forward with it with the tax he would owe when he succeeds. send it my way. let me unburden him." >> that offer goes to all viewers. >> rose: you have a serious purpose. what is the minimum tax that you think ought to be done today by congress and not wait for all the time it might take and all the deals it might take to reform the tax code. >> i think on incomes over one million that the excess over one million should
get the latest on the efforts to resolve the impasse over tax hikes and spending cuts. >> brown: then, we get two views of a palestinian bid for limited statehood, ahead of a key vote tomorrow at the united nations. >> warner: wonder why your bills are going up? paul solman examines "the fine print" with author and journalist david cay johnston. >> i'm not against corporations. i am in favor of rules that make you earn your profits in the competitive market. you don't get them through a government rule that lets the company reach in your wallet and take money. the kinds of profits that we're >> brown: after the election, what's next for immigration reform? ray suarez asks texas senator kay bailey hutchison and illinois representative luis gutierrez. >> warner: and on the "daily download," we look at how the obama administration is re-using digital information gathered for the campaign to rally support now. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations
and positioning over the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> would you subpoena a deal that does not include tax rate increases for the wealthy? is that something that's acceptable? >> no. pete: and a candid assessment of the stakes from one of the g.o.p.'s rising stars. >> the fiscal cliff is a creation of the political branch in washington, d.c. and an example of a dysfunctional process. that threatens our economy and millions of people across our economy. pete: is stalemate in washington stifling the economic recovery? joining us this thanksgiving week, peter baker of "the new york times." molly ball of "the atlantic." and jim tankersly of "national journal." >> award winning reporting and analysis. covering history as it happens. from our nationas capital, this is "washington week with gwen ifill." produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. to chart a greener path in the air and in our factories. to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >>
action by congress, americans will be forced through a series of automatic tax increases and spending cuts at the end of this year. it is what is known here as falling off the fiscal cliff. despite warnings, the global consequences -- and the global consequences of falling off that cliff, can washington he managed -- can washington manage it? thank you for joining me. the markets are looking in america and wondering whether politicians will be able to avoid this fiscal cliff. are things headed that way? but i think eventually they will. the good news -- >> i think eventually they will. the good news is that it is more like a fiscal beach. it is not like the debt ceiling. it is not a sudden that situation. there is a bit more flexibility. but one of the issues emerging is what the attitude of richer americans will be and whether they will accept the need to pay higher taxes. you probably read, as i did today, a very interesting op-ed by warren buffett, who points out that early in his career in the 1950's and 1960's when he was making a lot of money, the tax rate was many times higher
lawmakers are making little progress in resolving the stand-off over tax increases and spending cuts. the dow fell 89 points, the nasdaq lost nine, the s&p 500 down seven. >> tom: as susie mentioned, talks to resolve the fiscal cliff are moving slowly. one reason is that there is deep disagreement over whether entitlement programs like social security and medicare should be on the table right now or not, and the disagreement is sharpest over social security. darren gersh takes a look at why. >> reporter: the number-two man in the senate democratic leadership argues any fix for social security's finances should come after the immediate challenge is out of the way. >> i think we should take social security off the table for the current fiscal cliff and deficit discussion, but be very honest about what we're going to achieve in the near term. >> reporter: republicans pushed back, arguing social security is part of the deficit problem because it is no longer taking in enough in taxes to cover the benefits it pays out. social security makes up the difference by cashing in special treasury
. they will stop paying taxes to the spanish government. the decision comes ahead of a key regional election on sunday. >> in villages like this, most people will tell you that catalana, not spanish -- and you can spot the pro-independence catalon flag. he and others in this region say cathalon gets a rough deal, and that their taxes go to the central government, and they claim they get back a lot less to fund services like health and education. >> we do not think this is really a rebellion. we are still paying our taxes. the only difference is that instead of sending them to the spanish authorities, we are sending them to the cathalon treasury. >> the village will pay its taxes to the catalon government, even though it will, in turn, have to forward them on to madrid. if people and other villages join us, we can reach a point where the pressure is high and off -- heidi enough to make the catalon government changed and not send it to the spanish treasury anymore. keeping that money, because in the end, it is ours. >> as the economic crisis has worsened here, the regional government has almos
to pay a little bit more in taxes. >> reporter: the president and congressional leaders are unlikely to raise the retirement age for medicare to 67 since polls show that's very unpopular. and they will try to minimize opposition to any other changes they make. >> i think a pretty small share of the spending savings will be actually structural reforms or things that could directly affect beneficiaries and those things will probably be slowly phased in. >> reporter: but without an agreement to trim entitlements, republicans say they won't raise taxes. and the white house says the president is not backing down. >> he will not sign an extension of the bush-era tax cuts for the top 2% because it's bad economic policy. >> reporter: the president's tax plans got some support from legendary investor warren buffett today. writing in the new york times, buffett says higher taxes won't lead the wealthy to go on strike and give up promising investment opportunities. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: talk of the fiscal cliff threat didn't seem to hurt cyber monday, the biggest online sh
be done about that. among other things, you're saying taxes should go-- in other words, the bush tax cuts should be allowed to expire on everyone under $500,000. which is more than what the president is saying. he's saying it ought to be at 250. yet difference? and have you tukd him about that? >> sure, yeah, yeah, it was over 500, not under 500. yeah, i-- that position, judy, is one that i put on the table a year ago. and i'll tell you why. there isn't anything sort of theological about the $500,000 number. it's just a compromise. the democrats' position has been tax cuts to expire over 250. the republicans' position has been make all the tax cuts permanent. so a year ago i put a of a compromise on the table. if that compromise were accepted, it would raise $500 billion in revenue over the next 10 years, which would take the potential trillion-dollar sequester and cut it in half. and there are a couple of other steps i put on the table during the campaign as well that would reduce the need to find savings that would shred the safety net or hurt the economy. i am really heartened by the o
? >> one thing i'm worried about is the fiscal cliff issue, the tax increases and spending cuts that take place january 1 unless congress and the president reach a deal. businesses have been worried about that for months. maybe consumers are start-- maybe it's starting to creep into their thinking as well. we saw a weaker consumer sentiment number last week. that's thing to watch to worry about as we wonder what the holiday season will be like. >> brown: nariman behravesh, is it strange or do things really change? on the one hand, we want people to get out and spend, but on the other hand, we still talk about over-spending and spending money people didn't really have was part of the problem that got us into this state in the first place. so what's-- that sounds like a little bit of a disconnect. where are we on that? >> well, i think neil is right in saying consumer finances are in much better shape right now. so in that sense, the kind of spending we're seeing now is more sustainable. it's healthier in a sense. debt levels are down. people are not taking, say, home equity out to spend on
. >> rose: right. >> i don't think the tax question was a hard question. the commerce clause question i think was hard. i could have seen that coming out the other way. but to be in the majority on that, but lose on the tax question, i would never have guessed. >> rose: i mean, i was totally surprised by the tax aspect of it. >> tell me about it. >> rose: i presume you have -- it came out of left field to people or right field, which was it? >> and it was a tax for one purpose but not for another purpose. anyway, water over the d a.m. >> rose: i know you always say that. you sort of say to people about bush versus gore. get over it, get over it. >> >> rose: yet it decide add presidential election. >> the supreme court was going to decide it. the issue was -- >> rose: you blame gore because he. >> he wanted judges to decide it so judges decided it. >> rose: you have no regret about that, do you? >> oh, it was an easy case, it really was. >> rose: why was it so easy? >> look,. >> rose: you stopped the florida court -- >> yes, but on a principled question of whether the florida courts viol
court ruling called "speech now," and the politically active tax exempt groups which also represented the other most important trend hereby the growth in undisclosed money. these groups call themselves social welfare groups even though they're very political in their messages, and social welfare groups don't have to say who their donors are or where their money comes from. so that's a really big change. >> woodruff: matea gold, how did they operate differently from what we've seen in the past? many of them don't have to disclose-- some do, but many don't. what else was different? >> well, i think as, liga mentioned, the c-4 activity is new. we saw it in past elections but citizenses united gave them a legal right to engage in independent political spending and they really did so with vigor. one of the things that is important to remember remember when we talk about the $1 billion in outside spending. that's just the spending that was reported. there are probably hundreds of millions of dollars more that we don't know about. >> woodruff: and what did the money go toward? we assume, eli
. consumers will likely feel less well-off with coming tax hikes and spending cuts. even more reason for retailers to cash in now. >> for more on the black friday rash, i spoke a brief time ago with a bloomberg tv anger in new york. stephanie, thank you for coming in instead of doing a bit of shopping yourself. >> i am happier to be with you than wrestling at walmart. >> does this type of frenzied spending actually have any long- term benefit for the economy? >> is interesting. it is not just black friday. as was mentioned earlier, it is now black thursday, thanksgiving day, cyber monday, monday. so many of these retailers are offering incredible deals both online and in stores. they are not necessarily jacking up profitability, but they are creating a frenzy. shopping on these giving or the day after has become a cultural phenomenon. so many go out as part of a tradition and shop the next day. some folks were getting rain checks because the stores did not have enough in stock. if you compare it to back to school, back to school is something retailers have not been able to truly harn
influential tax >> he did released three albums but they completely real imagine what the electric guitar could do. people are still exploring what he laid out in those records. it also does not heard he was flamboyant, as flamboyant as he was gifted. he died tragically young. >> he has been described as number one. aru else is a distant number 2. >> he continues to be the mountaintop. he tops every magazine poll. you are right. everybody is a distant number 2. his contemporaries knew this. when he came to london, eric clapton, pete townshend saw him play. people were aghast at his incredible ability, and the volume. >> what was it he did with his electric guitar that was so new? i'm talking about the music. >> well, leaving aside the theatrics, which he did was explorer feedback in a way no one had. he pushed the guitar passed limits that people understood it to have. his sound is one that what he played and the screeching noise as he could conjure and control. he recreated the instrument and it showed what his possibilities were. >> you have to talk about his physicality. he was scruffy
buying plan: more austerity in the form of tax hikes, government pay and pension cuts and the like to be overseen by his bank and the international monetary fund. for all the public reassurances, new austerity conditions have sparked bitter protests. in spain. in greece, twice bailed out already and yet again pleading for more slack. this protest was prompted by an october visit from german prime minister angela merkel, who many greeks blame for the painful cuts they've already endured. but, back at home, merkel must contend with an anti-bailout public in germany a germany which must ultimately approve any europe-wide debt relief program, since it funds about a quarter of the european central bank. but germany has no choice. it has to keep playing the game. or at least that's the conviction of a key insider, new york lawyer lee buchheit. >> as the french say: for want of better, and for fear of worse. >> reporter: buchheit is mr. insider-- greece's chief debt negotiator. he's managed the country's bargaining strategy these past pinched years: and is the go-to guy for many a nation
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)